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Address

Mailing Address:

Mecklenburg County Public Health
249 Billingsley Road
Charlotte, NC 28211

Office Location:


Mecklenburg County Public Health
249 Billingsley Road
Charlotte, NC 28211

MAP

HOW ARE WE DOING?

Hours: Mon-Fri  8 a.m. - 5 p.m.

Contact

Please do not send confidential information via email.
704-336-4700

Key Initiatives

​Priority Populations











Although cigarette smoking has declined significantly since 1964, disparities in tobacco use remain across groups defined by race, ethnicity, educational level, and socioeconomic status and across regions of the country. Priority Populations are groups that use tobacco at higher rates than the general population and experience higher rates of secondhand smoke exposure. Youth and young adults are two populations at particular risk. Additional populations that warrant special attention for the advancement of health equity include:

  • African Americans
  • American Indians or Alaska Natives
  • Armed services members and military veterans
  • Asian Americans, Native Hawaiians, or Pacific Islanders
  • Hispanics/Latinx
  • Lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender, queer/questioning, (LGBTQ+) individuals
  • People of lower socioeconomic status (SES)
  • People who live in rural communities
  • People with mental health and/or substance use disorders (MH/SUD)

Mecklenburg County Snapshot

The Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System (BRFSS) is a state‐based system of health surveys that collects information on health risk behaviors, preventive health practices, and health care access primarily related to chronic disease and injury. Below is the 2020 tobacco behavior data for adults aged 18 and older in Mecklenburg County.

Smoking Rates​ ​

Gender​ ​ ​ ​ ​ ​Ethnicity Education​ ​ Income​ ​


​Male​Female​White​Black​Other​Latinx<HS
​HS +
​< $50k
​$50k+

Currently smoking

​11.6%

14.6%

​9%

​10.5%

​14.1%

​12.6%

​9.2%

​18.4%

​9.1%

​21.7%

​4.8%

​ ​Secondhand Smoke Exposure ​ ​ ​ ​ ​ ​ ​ ​ ​ ​

​Home​7.4%​7.3%​7.5%​4.8%​11.4%​N/A​N/A​14.3%​4.7%​12.5%​4.1%
​Work​2.74%​4%​1.6%​1.7%​2%​N/A​6.4%​4%​2.3%​5.1%​0.8%
Smoking Cessation ​ ​ ​ ​ ​ ​ ​ ​ ​ ​ ​ ​
​Tried to Quit
​52.1%​46.8%​59.7%​52.6%​54.1%​N/A​N/A​38.6%​62.6%​55.4%46.3%​
​Health Professional
Advised

61.9%

61.6%

62.3%

64.9%

70.5%

N/A

​N/A

​66.2%

​58.6%

59.8%

​91.9%
Health Professional Recommended...​
         Medicines to Quit Smoking: N/A                      
         Medicines and Methods to Quit Smoking: 15.5%



Social Justice

Tobacco use is not an equal opportunity killer.

Smoking disproportionately affects those most in need such as the poor, the homeless, racial minorities, LGBTQ persons, and those suffering frommental illness and substance use disorders. There are up to 10 times more tobacco ads in back neighborhoods than in other neighborhoods.

Saving Black Lives: African American Tobacco Control Leadership Council

Black Lives, Black Lungs

 

Active Military and Veterans

Service members or military veterans are more likely to use tobacco products than civilians. About 1 in 3 veterans use tobacco. Many service members start using tobacco after they enter military service, and cigarette smoking is more common among service members who have been deployed overseas. In addition to adversely affecting their health, the high prevalence of tobacco use among military and veteran personnel also has a significant financial impact. In 2014, tobacco use cost the Department of Defense nearly $1.8 billion in medical and non-medical costs. Learn more >>

People with Lower Socioeconomic Status

In the U.S., people living below the poverty level and people having lower levels of educational attainment–or lower socioeconomic status (SES)—have higher rates of cigarette smoking than the general population. Smoking also disproportionately affects the health of people with low SES. Lower income cigarette smokers suffer more from diseases caused by smoking than do smokers with higher incomes. Plus, tobacco companies often target their advertising campaigns toward low-income neighborhoods and communities. Learn more >>

LGBTQ Community

Smoking among lesbian, gay, and bisexual adults in the United States is much higher than among heterosexual/straight adults. About 1 in 5 lesbian, gay, and bisexual adults smoke cigarettes, compared with about 1 in 7 heterosexual/straight adults. Cigarette smoking is also higher among transgender adults than among adults whose gender identity corresponds with their birth sex (cisgender). Learn more >>

Tobacco Use in LGBTQ Communities: Truth Initiative:

Tobacco Impact Model for the U.S Adult LGBTQ+ Community: National LGBT Cancer Network

Fact Sheets: LGBT HealthLink

Charlotte Pride: Tobacco-Free Mecklenburg partners on the annual Charlotte Pride Festival and Parade to share tobacco-free messages and motiviation to Mecklenburg County's LGBTQ community.



Resources

Health Equity in Tobacco Prevention and Control: Best Practice User Guide: (CDC)

National African American Tobacco Prevention Network (NAATPN)

Action on Smoking & Health

Tobacco Education Clearinghouse of California

Truth Initiative: Tobacco Is a Social Justice Issue: Racial and Ethnic Minorities


Fact Sheets

Cigarillos

Menthol Quick Talking Points

Juul Fact Sheet

How Smoking and Nicotine Damage Your Body: American Heart Association


Contact:

For more information, contact Kim Caldwell, Tobacco Control Priority Populations Coordinator, at 980-279-7603 or Kimberly.Caldwell@MeckNC.gov.


Address

Mailing Address:

Mecklenburg County Public Health
249 Billingsley Road
Charlotte, NC 28211

Office Location:


Mecklenburg County Public Health
249 Billingsley Road
Charlotte, NC 28211

MAP

HOW ARE WE DOING?

Hours: Mon-Fri  8 a.m. - 5 p.m.

Contact

Please do not send confidential information via email.
704-336-4700

Key Initiatives

close alertCounty services are operating at a limited capacity. Questions about COVID-19? Call Public Health Hotline: 980-314-9400